Level III Review | Behavioral Finance

Behavioral finance is always a tough topic for candidates because the material can be a little confusing and the sheer volume can be overwhelming. The topic really doesn’t have to take a lot of time though and can be some easy points.

Behavioral Finance and the CFA Essays

Behavioral finance is typically tested in the morning essay section of the exam and has been worth an average of 14 points over the last three years. While you need every point you can get, that is just 3.8% of your total exam score. You want to approach the section with the idea of getting the concepts and basic definitions without taking valuable study time from higher point topic areas.
The material is extremely definitional and lends itself really well to flash cards. If you can get the basic definitions of the concepts and vocabulary then you should be able to get the vast majority of the points on the exam. Take a look at the prior years’ exams to get an idea of how the behavioral questions are asked.
Make sure you understand the basic difference whenever a contrast is offered, i.e. the difference between traditional finance and behavioral finance.
The cognitive and emotional biases have shown up on the essays frequently so make sure you have a good understanding of these.
Understand the five belief perseverance biases, consequences and detection:
Conservatism –failure to incorporate new info after a view is established
Confirmation – selectively seeking information that confirms a prior view
Representativeness – tendency to make decisions based on stereotypes or patterns
Illusion of control – belief of ability to influence uncontrollable events
Hindsight – overestimate “ex-post” the accuracy of forecasts
Understand the four processing error biases, consequences and detection:
Anchoring and adjustment – similar to conservatism but is usually tested as an under reaction to new information rather than avoidance of new info or no reaction at all
Mental Accounting – often tested as investors dividing total assets into ‘buckets’ based on categories (i.e. leisure, necessities, emergency)
Framing – tendency to respond differently depending on the situation
Availability – tendency to overestimate the possibility of an outcome based on ease of which the outcome comes to mind (know the four sources of availability bias)
Types of emotional biases:
Loss aversion – includes house money effect and myopic loss aversion, tendency to treat investments differently depending on whether it is a loss or a gain
Overconfidence – tendency to overestimate own ability or knowledge
Self control – preference for present consumption (certainty) versus future (uncertainty)
Status quo – avoidance of change
Endowment bias – emotional attachment to an asset or investment
Regret aversion – avoidance of decision due to fear of regret
The difference between a lot of these biases seem relatively minor and semantic but they often appear in the exam. Besides the basic definition and consequence, understand the slight difference between similar biases so you can distinguish them in a question. This is really where practice on some of the past essays comes in handy, to see how the Institute frames questions.
The material is extensive but you really do not need to memorize every detail. The Finquiz Study Guide has 32 pages of notes on Behavioral Finance for Study Session 3 and can better help to explain the topic. Again, my advice for the topic area is to get the basic idea and concepts and then move on to higher point topics. Even if you only get 60% of the points by just taking a quick look at the section, you’ve only missed 1.5% of the total exam.
I haven’t heard much from Level I or II candidates on which topics they want covered on the blog. Let me know if any particular study session or LOS is giving you problems and we will try to hit it in one of the blog postings.
‘til next time, happy studying
Joseph Hogue, CFA

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