Study Groups | candidates probably making the same mistakes that you are making

One of the most difficult aspects of the CFA exams is that you are basically on your own. Sure there are study groups but these are composed of candidates in the same exam level and probably making the same mistakes that you are making.
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Most Popular FinQuiz Blog Posts of 2015

Around this time of year, we love to look back at the posts that have helped CFA candidates the most and the ones most popular with candidates. Some articles are perennial favorites with candidates and a must read if you want to pass the exams. Other posts might not have gotten as much attention but carry some extremely valuable information and need to be highlighted.

The Finquiz CFA Blog had another record year in 2015. Nearly 280,000 candidates and potential candidates read 427,420 posts from January through November. That’s almost 1,300 pages a day of information helping candidates to pass the three CFA exams.

We’re proud to be able to bring this resource to candidates and will continue to get you the best information for CFA exam success for years to come. Check out the most popular posts of 2015 and of all-time below and get ready for a successful 2016!

Top Finquiz CFA Posts of 2015

2016 Level 1 CFA Curriculum Changes – The articles outlining the CFA curriculum changes for the following year are always the most popular and some of the most important information of the year. The CFA curriculum doesn’t change much from year to year but it’s must-know information if you’re going to pass the exam.

The changes to the 2016 CFA curriculum were relatively light this year compared to the changes last year. No topic weights were changed in the exams so that was a big relief. One reading was added to the CFA Level 1 exam and quite a few LOS were modified or changed. If you’re taking the Level 1 exam in June, especially if you’re retaking the exam, this may be the most important post you read all year.

2016 Level 2 CFA Curriculum Changes – The final study session of the CFA Level 2 curriculum (Portfolio Management) was changed for 2016, making it a must-read topic for next year. Click through to the article and download the changes to the curriculum along with Learning Outcome Statements for review.

2016 Level 3 CFA Curriculum Changes – Two readings were removed and one was added to the 2016 CFA curriculum so make sure you’re up-to-date if you want to pass the final level of the designation.

Top 9 Formulas for the CFA Level 1 Exam – New CFA candidates always get information overload when they first see the CFA curriculum, especially when it comes to formulas. The books are massive and mastering the entire curriculum seems impossible. Focus on the most important material first like these nine critical formulas and you’ll be well on your way to passing the exam.

2015 CFA Study Schedule – We updated our CFA study schedule this year given the changes in CFA topic weights across the three exams. The post includes a great daily blueprint for your study schedule as well as how to use some of the new resources available through technology. Of course, using condensed CFA study notes to complement the curriculum is still a core part of the schedule to save time and get the most critical information.

Top Finquiz CFA Posts of All Time

These next posts have stood the test of time and are some of the most popular on the blog. They cover some of the most common questions we get from CFA candidates and how to really make your study time productive.

The Passing Score on the CFA Exams and How to Use It (2013) – Even though the CFA Institute doesn’t release the minimum passing score (MPS) for the CFA exams, that doesn’t mean there isn’t some very important information you can use. Learn what has been said about the passing score and how to use the information to plan your study schedule.

The #1 Reason Candidates do not Pass the CFA Exams (2012) – This is one of my favorite articles. It covers one of the biggest hurdles for CFA candidates and three ways to overcome it. It’s a short post but one that every candidate should read before beginning their CFA study plan.

How to Pass the CFA Level 2 Exam (2012) – The Level 2 CFA exam is likely the most difficult of the three exams. A few candidates will tell you the first exam was difficult for how the massive amount of material surprises new candidates or that the third CFA exam was most difficult for its essay section. Most candidates agree though that the Level 2 exam is a quantitative monster. You will get into the most minute detail of financial statements and be expected to master a mountain of formulas.

I Passed the CFA Level 1 Exam, Why don’t I Have a Job? (2013) – Using the CFA exams and designation to get a job is one of the most frequent questions we get. Passing the exams will not get you a job but you can use your CFA progress to get your foot in the door. Check out the post to see how to use the CFA to land your dream job and how to get ahead.

There were quite a few great articles that didn’t make the cut. Check out the menu on the right of popular posts and make sure to use the search box above for any questions you have. The Finquiz CFA blog features more than 328 posts on passing the CFA exams and how to get the most from the CFA designation. Don’t miss your chance to get out in front of the rest and jumpstart your career!

‘til next time, happy studyin’
Joseph Hogue, CFA

CFA Study vs. Family

The title above is the title from a recent forum post on the LinkedIn group. While the underlying subject of juggling a personal life and family with the CFA exams is a constant topic, I thought the title was interesting and brought back memories of managing my own social life with exam preparation.

I thought the forum title was interesting because it is how many candidates feel about studying for the exams and…well, everything else. It seems that preparing for that 6-hour monster in June puts you at odds with everything else; your family, your friends, anything you previously enjoyed.

It’s tough to get in the necessary study time, for everyone but even more so for those with families. I was married while studying for the exams but was able to finish before we had any kids. The problem is, when you start to think of studying for the exams as, “this and nothing else,” you set yourself up for questioning whether it is worth it and end up postponing the designation.

Studying for the CFA exams shouldn’t be a this-or-that scenario but just needs to be integrated into your daily routine. Hundreds of thousands of candidates have done it and you can as well.

It is just a matter of making time where there was none before,

  • Lunchtime study – This doesn’t necessarily have to be cloistering yourself off to some remote part of the building and avoiding co-workers. A quick run through your flash cards while talking to co-workers can be a little less intrusive and still help you get some extra points.
  • Travel time – If there is any way you can take public transportation to and from work, this can be a huge boost to your study time. Sure, it may be a little inconvenient but shifting that hour or two of studying each day to the bus or train means more time with your family.
  • No rest for the wicked – This is the most common I hear but it has its limits. I concentrate better at night so it was no problem for me to stay up until midnight or later and study while others slept. You can get buy on five or six hours of sleep but don’t try to do it immediately. Try studying just a half hour more per night an increase it gradually so you don’t crash at work.
  • More efficient study – While the average time candidates take to study for the exam is 300 hours, it can be done on less but you need to spend your time where it counts the most. You will not be able to get through the curriculum multiple times. Spend more time on condensed study notes and working practice problems. For the first two levels, devote the majority of your time on the topic areas where you will see the most points.
  • Start earlier – I am still amazed that many of the same candidates that question how to juggle life with exam prep are the same ones that do not start studying until February or later. Three hundred hours divided by 26 weeks is a lot easier to handle than when it is crammed into 12 weeks or fewer. In fact, there is nothing that says you need to wait for the new curriculum to come out before you begin studying. Borrow the previous year’s curriculum from a local candidate and start working through it in July or August. Starting 40 weeks before the exam means you only have to study about 7.5 hours a week. That’s doable for even the busiest schedules.

It will be tough but will also be worth it. Not only will you be able to use one of the most respected and professional designations in the industry but you will also be able to say that you were able to complete something that few others could.

Families are forever, the CFA exams are only three years. Stay strong and push through it.

‘til next time, happy studyin’
Joseph Hogue, CFA

A CFA Blog! How long has this been here?

Now that you are firmly focused on studying and passing the CFA exam in June, let me digress and ruin your concentration. Sorry, I just came across the CFA blog managed by the Institute and was so impressed that I wanted to bring it to your attention.

Where have I been?


In our hectic daily routines, it can be tough to find new sources of information. It certainly doesn’t help that there are more than 350 million registered domains, an increase from virtual nonexistence only two decades ago. I have 11 sites bookmarked to my navigation panel (Federal Reserve FRED, Bloomberg, Morningstar, along with email accounts and a few other finance sites) and probably only use a handful of others on a daily basis.

I am plastered to my screen between eight and ten hours a day, sometimes including weekends, and just do not have time to hunt around the web for great new sources of information. I generally try to keep up with things the CFA Institute is doing, especially the newer ideas but this obviously wasn’t the case with the new blog.

I have to give credit to Josh Armstrong, CFA for posting one of the Institute’s blog posts on the forum group. I regularly read the Financial Analysts Journal and other publications sent out by the Institute, along with other research posted on the Institute’s site. When I found the blog site, the material was familiar but offered an ease of reading that was great.

Across the blog’s navigation bar is six categories of posts along with nine other categories from the CFA topic areas and a link for About Us and Authors. Clicking on each category will take you to posts specific to it but the site does not include a dated directory so finding a specific post can be a little difficult. It is also nearly impossible (or at least impossible without loosing your sanity) to find the original posting date of the site since you have to scroll down and click, ‘older posts’ continuously.

The posts run the gamut of research, polls, book reviews and advice. Twenty-eight posts were written in December, pretty impressive considering most people are more focused on their holiday weight gain than on financial writing during the month.

As blog posts, the content comes across as more conversational and easier to read than some of the Institute’s other publications. While this may not be as welcome to some of the hard-core researchers out there, I enjoyed being able to make it through an article without taking a master’s level course in stats. Posts include links to other publications and other helpful sites.

If you can find a couple of hours in your busy weekly schedule of work and study to visit the blog, your time will be well-rewarded. The blog does a good job of highlighting important material from the Institute’s site as well as some new stuff. You probably won’t read all of it but it will offer a quick way to keep up-to-date on some important ideas in the industry. I have bookmarked the site and will probably go back at least a couple of times a week.

Always on the lookout of good sites for market information and data. Any ideas?

Ok, digression over. Back to studyin’
Joseph Hogue, CFA