10 Minute Review of CFA Ethics and Standards

Even with the change to topic area weights on the CFA exams this year, CFA Ethics and Professional Standards remain extremely important. It is a lot of material but fortunately doesn’t change much from year to year and you’ve got a real opportunity to carry over some points to each exam if you learn it early.

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CFA Level 1 Jobs – How to get the perfect job

It’s a jungle out there! I get emails every week from candidates that continue frustrated in their job search, even after passing one or more levels of the CFA exam.
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CFA Curriculum Warning: Do Not Neglect

The actual length of the CFA curriculum varies a little each year but it’s generally between 2,500 and 3,200 pages. When you get the books in the mail, or receive the digital version, that may seem like a monstrous task. Over the three years of studying for the exams, I think my upper body strength grew just as much as my financial knowledge just from carrying the books around.

Study guides meant to substitute for the curriculum vary but generally range between 1,400 and 1,700 pages. At under two-thirds the length of the official curriculum, it seems like a no-brainer and I know many candidates who have only rarely even peaked inside their curriculum books.

And many of them are still candidates.

Do Not Neglect the Official CFA Curriculum!

Candidates that have tried to substitute the CFA curriculum with study guides have come to me afterwards with their horror stories. My reply is always the same, “I wish we had talked before because if you do the math then the answer is pretty obvious.” The minimum passing score for the exams is never released but I would guess it is around sixty-five percent. No candidate has failed with a score of 70% or better and I doubt if the Institute would want to charter someone that knows less than two-thirds of the subject matter.

Even the most gifted candidates are going to miss points. If about half the candidates fail the exam every year, I am guessing that most miss at least a tenth of the points and probably much more. We have no way of knowing but it’s obvious that you need every point you can get.

Now, I have seen pretty much all the study guides commercially available. There are some that do a pretty good job of condensing the material but none are able to get everything in a packet that is half the length of the curriculum. It’s impossible and information is going to get left out. Try to fit nearly 3,000 pages of information in less than 2,000 pages of notes and I would say you’re lucky if 20% of the information isn’t lost.

So if you neglect the official curriculum completely, you are already out something like 20% or more of the points. Now you need to remember at least 80% of the material just for a score of 64% on the exam.

Most of you have taken practice exams through test banks or the CFA Institute. How many have scored better than 80% on these? I know reading all those books is a daunting task but you just cannot afford to leave points on the table by neglecting the official curriculum.

CFA Study Guides

I don’t talk about the FinQuiz study notes much here on the blog other than to reference specific sections of the notes and the curriculum. I don’t want candidates to think I am being biased by pushing one particular study provider over another. But I can say, without any bias, that the FinQuiz notes have at least one big advantage over other study products, that they are meant to be used as a complement to the curriculum instead of a substitute.

The FinQuiz notes vary by length as well but are generally around 600 pages. It’s really the best of both worlds, you get 100% of the information from the curriculum and additional condensed explanations where you need them.

Free examples of the FinQuiz notes are available for download on the website. Take a look and compare them with the curriculum. FinQuiz regularly offers discounts on products and packages so you may want to contact the provider to get the best deal possible.

‘til next time, happy studyin’
Joseph Hogue, CFA

Last updated: August 10, 2016 at 4:30 am

CFA Retabulation ?

The results of the June CFA exams were released last week, marking the end to a long and difficult exam season. Less than half the level one candidates (43%) passed the exam with level two candidates doing a little better with 46% passing their CFA exam. These are both above the ten-year averages at 39% for the first CFA exam and 44% for the second exam.

Results for the level 3 CFA exam are due out on August 9th with an average pass rate of 53% over the last ten years.

CFA retabulation worth it?

Around this time, I get a lot of emails asking if candidates should request a retabulation of their CFA exam score. The CFA Institute offers the service, for a fee, but is it really worth it?

Understanding CFA Exam Results

CFA exam scores are given on a pass-no pass basis with a 10-level scoring system for those that did not pass. While the minimum passing score is never released, we know that no candidate has ever failed a CFA exam with a percentage score of 70% or higher.

The scoring band system of 10-levels for candidates that did not pass is an equal-band measure, meaning that each band is the same number of points. The number of points separating you from the next higher band are not known either but you can put together a rough estimate by thinking through it. If we assume anyone with a 70% passed and that even the candidate guessing on every question should have gotten a 20%, then we have about 50% within the ten bands or about 5% in each band.

There are a total of 360 points available on each CFA exam with individual questions worth three points each, not counting the essay portion of the level 3 CFA exam. That means, if there is a 5% difference from one band to the next, that you need to have answered as many as six more questions correctly (6*3 = 18 points) to make it to the next band.

This is a very rough estimate and we can’t know the actual numbers. I would say it is probably a maximum for the percent in each fail band. Even if each band is only 3% then you still have 10.8 points or at least three questions within each band.

What does this mean? For retabulation to change the score on your CFA exam to the next band, your original score will likely need to be wrong by at least three questions.

Should you Request a CFA Retabulation?

A CFA retabulation request for your exam score is due by the 9th of September along with your payment of the $100 fee. The CFA exam retabulation form is available here and must either be mailed or faxed to the address on the form. It takes between one and three weeks to receive your retabulation results by email.

CFA Retabulation will not change an incorrect answer to a correct one and will not get you extra points on missed questions. The process is done by hand but only checks to make sure the machine scored your answers correctly, noting which circles were marked.

For example – If you marked B, the correct answer, but the machine read your answer incorrectly as marking C then a CFA retabulation would result in a higher score. Retabulation of your CFA exam does not change the answer you marked, nor will it make a judgement call and give you partial credit for an incorrect answer.

Retabulation of the level 3 essay questions will not change the score given for a segment, only that your scores were added up correctly.

If the retabulation changes your score, you are refunded the $100 fee. If your score remains the same, your fee is not refunded.

There is no data released on scores changed by retabulation but I have never heard of anyone that got a higher score, much less anyone that changed a no-pass to a pass. If you are in the final fail band 10, you might consider it but it is still unlikely to make a difference. The accuracy rate on optical mark recognition (bubble-sheet scanners) is above 99% which means only 1% of tests have any error, much less an error on multiple questions.

It is extremely painful to feel like you wasted the last six months of your time but a retabulation isn’t likely worth the fee. Thinking about the tests in a larger context will make it a little easier. Really, how much difference does it make whether you pass this year or next when considering a 30- or 40-year career. Your additional studying only means that you will have a stronger grasp on critical material and the opportunity to be a better professional.

Take your CFA exam fail as what it is, a learning experience. Commit to hitting the material early next year and mastering the curriculum.

‘til next time, happy studyin’
Joseph Hogue, CFA

Last updated: August 6, 2016 at 5:48 am

When to start studying for CFA ?

Looking through forum posts and talking to a few candidates about timing and planning for the CFA exams provides some interesting stats and might help you assess how well your own preparation is going. The two core issues here are: when to start studying and exactly how much is enough studying.

When to Start studying for CFA Exam ?

It might be a little simplistic, but I see candidates starting their study plans in one of three categories: really early, about right, and what are you thinking! The actual dates started appear to follow a fairly normal distribution with the median around mid-February. I usually started with the ‘really early’ crowd between October and November, so I’m a little biased toward earlier rather than later.

While pre-January may be earlier than necessary, we see a lot of people waiting until March to begin studying. Biased I may be but 13 weeks to cram approximately 300 hours of studying seems a stretch. There will always be the intellectual giants out there (or at least those that think they are) that will have no problem learning all the material in three months. Then again, while actual pass-fail statistics are not available, I would put good money on the bet that the 50% of candidates in the fail band come disproportionately from these late starters.

Is it too late to begin studying for CFA Exam ?

Then there are always the (comical) posts in late April and through May asking for opinions whether it is too late to begin studying and still pass the exam. Most of the candidates I have met and talked to were fairly smart, but sometimes I’ve got to wonder.

Like I said, I am probably a little overcautious and biased to starting early. Most candidates have fairly relaxed schedules and can sacrifice a few extra hours for something that is undoubtedly going to change your career prospects and arguably your life (going out with that hot co-ed you met last week or keeping up with this season’s American Idol are not as important as you think). Nothing I could say would get most of you to start before January, but hopefully you will not wait until March.

How Much is Enough for CFA Exam ?

More important than when you start studying is (duh!) how much studying you do. Reading through forums and taking a few polls, I was surprised that the consensus is for reading through the material only once and then working through practice problems and a mock exam. At most, I found that candidates expect to read through study guides once then review a quarter to half of the material again. Most candidates planned on working through all the end-of-chapter questions and doing ‘some’ practice problems from a provider question bank.

Again, I might be a little conservative, but this seems entirely inadequate. Who are all these candidates with eidetic (photographic) memory that can pick everything up that easily? Practice exams taken through question banks will give you a good indication if you have picked up the material but most do not start taking these until late in the season. What happens when you take your first inclusive practice exam in May and find out you are not nearly as prepared as you thought?

The candidates that expressed a higher level of confidence with their preparation were mostly those that had read through all of the material at least twice and had started monitoring their progress through practice exams at least two months before the test date. This leaves time to focus on a few of the weaker topic areas as well as going through the material with a few other media (video, summary sheets, flash cards).

I guess it comes down to being realistic about your abilities and taking a rational look at the statistics. Surveys by CFA Institute show that candidates (both passing and otherwise) averaged around 300 hours of study time for each exam. We also know that approximately 50% of candidates fail the exam each year. This is one area where being ‘average’ is likely to not be enough.

I imagine that the absolute number of hours reported belies a fairly large distribution, but we’ll call it 200 hours minimum and maybe 400 maximum needed to pass the exams. Now think about your pre-CFA studying schedule. How many hours per week do you think you can realistically commit to studying? You need to plan conservatively if you are married, have children, or have a job with increasing workload around quarterly reporting. Life happens, don’t expect to be able to study as much as you would like every week.

‘til next time, happy studyin’
Joseph Hogue, CFA

Last updated: August 4, 2016 at 4:21 am

 

Five Reasons CFA Candidates Fail the CFA Exams (Part 4)

We’ve already been through three of our five reasons that keep candidates from passing the CFA exams. The first reason was too much time spent studying about studying, posted here. The second reason, planning a schedule around life and burnout, is a big one for those of us with a family and a full-time job. Yesterday’s post, the difference between active and passive studying, is probably the biggest hurdle to success for most candidates.

Should I use a third-party prep provide for CFA Exam

Today’s post again deals with the planning process, not finding the right time to study but finding the right resources. The big question on the forums is always, “Should I use a third-party prep provider or just stick with the curriculum?” The question goes deeper though to different products and ways to look at the material as well. Disclaimer: Obviously, we here at FinQuiz have a vested interest in the answer. Our study guides have been developed as a great complement to the curriculum and we’re proud of the feedback we receive every year. That said, this blog is here for all candidates and we want to see you pass the exams regardless. Check out our examples on the homepage or contact us and we can talk about helping you get the most for your time.

Variety is the Spice of Life

Beyond the specific test prep provider, candidates also need to look at a variety of different products. The CFA curriculum at each level is in excess of thousands of pages. I was always a fan of looking at it from as many different angles as possible. This helped to break-up the monotony and took advantage of the strengths within different media.

CFA Study Guides – two formats

Study guides come in two formats, those based on the specific Learning Outcome Statements and those that are curriculum-based. Some providers reason that structuring the guides on the specific LOS makes it easier to package the material in shorter pieces. FinQuiz has taken a different approach, developing curriculum-based guides as a complement to the curriculum instead of as a substitute. By following the curriculum, the guides are more condensed and focus on those areas that give candidates the most problems.

Some candidates completely ignore the curriculum, opting instead to only read study guides. Granted, this cuts down on the time spent to get through the material but you are sure to miss some points. As condensed notes, the study guides are not going to include 100% of the testable material in the curriculum. If the guide only hits 90% of the material and the candidate only retains 80% of the guide, then their score is already maxed out at 72%. This is why FinQuiz feels that a complement to the curriculum is more appropriate than a substitute.

Flash Cards for the CFA Exam

Flash Cards are the most appropriate for focusing in on those last remaining areas in which you are having trouble or keeping those important formulas and processes fresh in your mind. I also like flash cards for their portability and ease of use during short periods. We get (2) fifteen minute breaks during the day, not really enough to open up the books and start a new section but plenty of time to go through 10 cards.

You can easily buy or borrow cards off the internet. Most providers sell sets for around $125-$175 or someone in your social network probably has some you could copy. The best way, though, is to make your own cards. It may take a little longer, but they will be customized for your learning and will provide the opportunity to write out the material.

CFA Exam Videos

Videos are a good way to look at the material from a different format. The majority of your studying is going to be through reading a section and answering problems so it is nice to take a break every once in a while and have someone explain the curriculum to you. This is especially useful for some of the more complicated sections where a live example might help. While FinQuiz does not yet offer videos, there are many available on YouTube and can be found through a simple search.

CFA Exam Test banks

 

Test banks include thousands of problems to work through and are a great complement to those in the official curriculum. Working practice problems are really where you need to be focusing your time because the retention is so much better using this active learning method than simply reading the material. Candidates need to work through all the end-of-chapter questions and ‘blue-box’ examples within the curriculum. This is going to be the closest to the style and difficulty that you’ll see in the exams. The few hundred problems included in the curriculum really isn’t enough to prepare for the exams, making test banks absolutely necessary.

When working through a set of questions, don’t just score your results at the end of a study session. Go back through the questions. Figure out why you missed those incorrect answers and make sure the correct answers were from an understanding of the material and not simply a lucky guess.

Practice Exams for CFA

Mock Exams need to be a part of your study program so you are not surprised by the six-hour testing marathon in June. Many candidates handle their studying exclusively in short, one-hour chunks then do poorly on the exam because they are not prepared for the level of mental fatigue. Further, mock exams force you to answer problems across the curriculum instead of only looking at specific sections. Facing a test of the entire curriculum is much different than looking at each section immediately after reading over the topic area, make sure you are prepared.

Too many candidates rely solely on the official CFA curriculum without taking advantage of other available media and resources. Besides offering different approaches and advantages specific to each media, using different resources are about the best way possible of avoiding burnout while studying for the CFA exams. Look through the free examples that many third-party providers offer or ask other candidates which provider they used. The incremental costs to using a few products are well worth the expense to avoid having to retake the exam.

‘til next time, happy studyin’
Joseph Hogue, CFA

Last updated: August 1, 2016 at 5:13 am

Five Reasons CFA Candidates Fail the CFA Exams (Part 3)

We’ve covered two of the top five reasons candidates fail in the previous weeks’ posts. I was going to finish the series up with this one but could not wait. I figured there are candidates studying for the December exam now and they need to read this before it’s too late to get back on track.

Frequent readers of the blog will recognize this common hurdle that candidates face. It is a problem all students face. Worst of all, it is not something you can overcome once and not worry about it again. You have to continuously watch for it to keep yourself on course.

The number one reason candidates do not pass the CFA exams is the difference between active and passive learning.

Passive learning is those activities where you do not participate but really just absorb the material through sensory perception. This includes reading, listening to a lecture or watching a video. Studies have shown that students remember only about 10% to 30% of the material through passive study.

Active learning, by contrast, is those activities where you engage the material in an interactive manner. This includes discussion, presentation and problem solving. Students are able to remember up to 90% of the material when they use active studying as part of their routine.

Just Reading the CFA Curriculum isn’t Going to Make It


Now that you know the difference, you are probably saying, “Oh crap, I am doing nothing but passive learning!” Don’t be too hard on yourself. Most school systems are built around passive learning (listening to lectures and reading textbooks) and students only grudgingly engage in active learning.

For me, it was only with the realization that the CFA exams were nowhere near as easy as most of my college curriculum and that passive learning was not going to cut it that I made the commitment to active learning. Its not the easier route, but would you rather spend a hundred hours reading to remember 10 hours of material (people typically remember about 10% of what they read) or would you rather work practice problems for about 11 hours to remember the same 10 hours worth of material?

Practice, Practice and yet more Practice for CFA Exam

1) Practice problems are the most obvious form of active learning. Make sure you do all the end-of-chapter questions and ‘blue-box’ examples in the CFA curriculum. These are going to be the most closely related to actual exam questions and are pretty close to the same level of difficulty.

The FinQuiz test bank includes almost 5,000 questions created directly from the curriculum and more than 500 item sets. It is a great supplement to the textbook questions and will help avoid boredom from doing the same questions multiple times.

Study groups for CFA Exam

2) Study groups are a good way to discuss and think about the material, but make sure you are efficiently spending your time on the curriculum and not talking about unrelated things that happened over the week. Flash cards are a good resource to use for study groups. You learn first by developing your own set of cards, then learn by working through other group member’s cards as well.

Level III candidates absolutely MUST work old essay questions.

3)  The Institute releases the last three years’ essay questions with guideline answers. We worked through about 12 of these before the exam this year and are available on the blog. Do not let the essay section surprise you. It can be extremely easy or extremely difficult.

I first wrote about active versus passive learning in a post earlier but thought I would include it in this ‘top 5’ list because it trips up so many candidates. Click here for more information on active learning and how it can help you remember 90% of what you study.

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for Level I . (1440 Questions)

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Note: You will get access to 24 PDF files in total. Immediately downloadable on Smart Phone/Tablet/PC.

Direct Link to purchase ‘FinQuiz Mock Exams 1-6  CFA Level I December 2016’:

Click Here to Buy 6 Mock Exams of CFA Level 1 December 2016 of 240 Questions each (Total:1440 Questions)

FinQuiz – Owned and operated by a team of CFA Charter holders.

‘Til next time, happy studyin’
Joseph Hogue, CFA

Last updated: November 21, 2016 at 2:51 am

And you thought practicing FinQuiz Mocks was tough! - Copyrights FinQuiz.com

And you thought practicing FinQuiz Mocks was tough! – Copyrights FinQuiz.com

Five Reasons CFA Candidates Fail the CFA Exams (Part 2)

I used to know a First Sergeant in the Marine Corps, one of the hardest and most admired men I have ever known. First Sergeant had a saying for when someone failed or things didn’t quite work out, as if all failure came down to one motto, and it brings us to the second of five reasons why candidates fail the CFA exams.

“Prior proper planning prevents p*ss poor performance!” For those that do not know, ‘p*ss’ is an expletive used here as an adjective for how severely you just messed up.

Lack of planning may seem like an oversimplification as to why candidates fail the exams, but much of the time it is just that simple.

CFA Exam – 300 hours studying

Candidates know that it takes an average of 300 hours studying to learn the curriculum and pass any given level. That’s not just some number I pulled out of the air. Every year, the CFA Institute surveys candidates and every year those passing the exam report that they spent about 300 hours studying. For the most part, candidates understand the time required and most plan to put in the necessary time to pass.

They figure 300 hours divided by 3-4 months is about 20 hours per week studying and they plan on starting in late February for the June exam.

But that is about as far as their planning goes.

Life and CFA Exam

Then something happens I like to call, “LIFE.” Life is your little sister getting married and you have to fly to Albuquerque for the wedding. Life is first quarter reporting and you putting in 80 hours a week at the office to get client presentations done. Life is your son’s Little League Championship series that takes you to every baseball diamond in the state and out for pizza afterwards. Life is all the things that get in the way and cause you to deviate from your study plans.

Besides the little things in life that come up to detour the best made plans, I always planned ahead for those cabin fever moments. These are when you have been hitting the books every day for a month, when you have locked yourself away studying for so long that you see the efficient frontier in your sleep. These are the moments you need to step back and take a day or two off of studying or face some serious burnout.

When to start studying for CFA Exam

A lot of candidates and charter holders cringe when I tell them I started studying in November or earlier, more than seven months before the exam. When I say I started studying, they assume it was studying as they are used to doing when they start in February or March (studying every day for 15 hours a week until the exam).

When I say I ‘started’ so early, I mean a relaxed schedule of 5-10 hours a week for the first couple of months. Just reading through the curriculum but not worrying too much about problems or the exam. After the first reading, I would start through it again using study guides and working practice problems. This all gave me enough time to work through the curriculum and not worry about setbacks from ‘LIFE’ or burnout. I could take a week off if I needed to and still get back on schedule without drastically increasing study time.

There is a procedural component of your study planning as well, of which we’ll talk about tomorrow, but this time component is what trips up candidates the most. After all the time spent learning about the exams, after all the money spent on resources, it seems too simplistic that a lack of time is what causes candidates to fail but it’s true.

Learn to plan ahead and plan to pass the exams.
Thank you First Sergeant.

‘til next time, happy studyin’
Joseph Hogue, CFA

For the first part of the series and the problem of meta-studying, click here.

Last updated: July 27, 2016 at 6:15 am