Studying for the CFA Exam without knowing your studying



It’s not even January yet and the last thing many of you want to think about is studying for the CFA exams in June. I always liked to start early and set a relaxed study schedule but I’m not going to tell you that you need to get busy studying immediately.

What I can tell you is that there is a way you can actually keep your skills fresh while waiting for later to really start studying. It’s a little thing I like to call stealth studying and everyone should work it into their daily routine.

CFA Institute Resources

Your first stop will be some of the great resources on the CFA Institute website and the Enterprising Investor blog. The Institute’s Publications & Multimedia page sports a seemingly infinite amount of research and resources. Resources are indexed by asset class and topic area with separate sections for career advice like networking, management and current topics. A lot of the resources are quick presentation-type material so you can look through it within a few minutes to get the general idea. It’s a great way to generate ideas for your own work.

Must Read Books

The Enterprising Investor blog also offers regular reviews for books related to the industry. Within the reviews, you’ll find a mix of educational books to further your skills and books that will entertain. I just finished Alan Blinder’s, “After the Music Stopped,” after reading the review on the site and really enjoyed the insightful analysis of the financial crisis.

Of course, Graham’s timeless book, “The Intelligent Investor,” is always a good start for those that haven’t yet read it. After months of detailed and rigorous study of the CFA curriculum, it’s nice to sit down with a relatively straight-forward and simple tome.

Networking with colleagues

Readers of the blog will know that I’m a big advocate of active involvement in your local CFA society. Most likely, you are going to want to approach these people for a job opportunity in the future so it’s best to get to know them first. Networking with other candidates and charterholders serves another function, getting some of the best insight from some of the best minds in the business.

So stealth studying isn’t really anything new, it’s just keeping involved in your industry. Reading books, whether for information or entertainment, watching presentations from other professionals and connecting with others in the field will all help to keep your mind sharp.

Whether you are working in investment analysis and management yet or not, it’s best to start thinking of yourself as a professional. You’ve committed to one of the most difficult professional designations out there and just the Level I CFA curriculum puts you well on your way. As a professional, it’s also best to stop thinking in terms of a period to study for the exams and the rest of the year in which you get to relax. Being a professional is about constant improvement and keeping up to date with the industry.

The resources above will not only help you prepare for your next CFA exam but will help you become a better professional.

‘til next time, happy…studying?
Joseph Hogue, CFA

Relaxing after the CFA December Exam – but for how long?



Congratulations to all the candidates that sat for the CFA Level 1 exam last Saturday. As I wrote in last week’s post, you’ve already shown your worth in the perseverance and dedication to professionalism and I welcome you to our group of CFA candidates and charterholders.

Many of you are now looking to the next step, the CFA Level 2 exam in June and wishing you had enough time to relax and reconnect with friends and loved ones.

There are advantages and disadvantages to jumping right back into the curriculum and you might just decide that you have more time to relax than you thought.

Sitting for the June exam after December’s Test

As December candidates, you’ve got a pretty unique opportunity to finish up the CFA exams earlier. Trying to think back on my own experience, I had not decided to pursue the designation until November so really didn’t have the option. If you’ll have the experience requirement fulfilled by late 2016 then you could potentially shave six months time off the process compared to peers.

Reasons to take the June exam after a December exam

  • A lot of the CFA Level 2 curriculum builds heavily off of concepts learned in the level 1 curriculum. In fact, many of the sections in the curriculum start off with optional refresher pages to remind you. Going straight into studying for the second exam helps to avoid losing any of that information in a year’s worth of partying and working (ok, partying for the younger candidates, working for the old timers).
  • The level 2 curriculum really gets into the detail of financial analysis and working through a company’s financial statements. A lot of candidates are pumped up about hitting the books, even after a grueling few months of studying for the first exam. The curriculum is also undeniably good for your career and the sooner you learn the material, the sooner you can impress your boss with your expertise in analysis.
  • You could easily wait until late January when December exam results come out to register and being studying for the second exam. This gives you nearly two months to enjoy with your family and friends. Believe me, you’re first few years as an equity analyst will be busier than that.

Don’t forget that the application deadline for the CFA Awareness Scholarship is February 2nd so you may want to get started on that ahead of time. This scholarship is for key influencers in the academic and financial communities and reduces the registration fee to $350, including the curriculum ebook. Check your local CFA society as well, many offer scholarships for local candidates.

The registration deadline for the standard fee on the June exam is the 18th of February though you have until March 18th as a late-register.

What’s the rush?

Whether you’ve considered it or not, there is nothing wrong with taking a year and a half to sit for the CFA Level 2 exam either. I know everyone wants to get through the exams as soon as possible but there are also advantages to taking your time.

  • You can still start your study for the Level 2 exam by borrowing curriculum from other candidates or getting it from the local library. Make sure the readings are up to date but the curriculum really doesn’t change that much so most will still be applicable.
  • Even if you set a study schedule that takes you to the June 2016 exam, you can still sit for the 2015 exam to see how it is. You only pay for the enrollment fee once but will have to pay the registration fee again.
  • Burn out is a big problem for candidates and you might not feel like a couple of months is enough to spend with family and friends after taking the Level 1 exam.
  • The CFA Level 2 exam is, in my opinion, by far the most difficult of the three. The detail and the number of formulas are intense, reasons why the average pass rate is only 44% over the last ten years. Spreading your Level 2 studies out over 18 months means you can really take your time with the material and master it.
  • Many candidates will not complete the experience requirements by late 2016 anyway and will need to wait to use the designation. If you are not working in analysis or asset management now, it might be a good idea to find a job that will move you in that direction. Starting a new job takes time but a relaxed Level 2 study schedule will mean more time to learn your new responsibilities.

I know it is unlikely that many December candidates will consider foregoing the 2015 exam to take the 2016 exam instead but I thought I would outline the advantages and disadvantages of each option. Whichever you choose, make the commitment to do it well and continue being the professional you have shown yourself to be.

‘til next time, happy studyin’
Joseph Hogue, CFA

Last Week to the CFA Exam, Welcome to the Club



Just one more week to the December level 1 CFA exam, can you believe it? The time seemed to fly by every year I was a candidate and as much as I wanted to get through the exams, I always wished for just one more week of preparation.

But win, lose or draw next Saturday you’ve already shown the heart and discipline to make yourself a better professional. For that, I say, “Welcome to the club of CFA Candidates and Charterholders!”

You see, being a CFA charterholder isn’t about passing a couple of tests. It isn’t even about just being able to put those three little letters after your name. Being a charterholder is about being a true professional and being part of a network of professionals.

Through the CFA Institute and your network of other candidates or charterholders, you’ve got access to some of the best minds and information in the industry. Asset management gurus like Bill Gross, Abby Joseph Cohen and Ben Graham, all charterholders!

The Institue also offers a knowledge library on the website filled with some of the best published material and media in the industry. It’s easy to forget so set a regular reminder to check in on the site for new information and professional development. The website is pretty user-friendly. You can browse research by topic or by area of work. There are also some marketing templates for brochures, pitchbooks and mailers that you can use for your job.

Many of you are just starting your careers and will want to login to the Institute’s Jobline. Through the portal, you’ll find nearly 900 current listings from more than 200 employers all looking for CFA charterholders or candidates.

I got an email invitation last week to be a judge in next year’s CFA Institute Research Challenge, an annual global competition in equity analysis. The research challenge is a great way to get that initial experience into equity research and feedback from professionals. At events like this or one of the many networking events through your local society, you’ll find all the opportunity you need for professional development and to advance your career.

I am going to level with you. Your #1 goal in life may seem to be passing that exam on Saturday but at this point, it really doesn’t mean as much as you think. You have taken the first step to becoming a true professional in the field and your score on one test will not change that.

So take the rest of the week to kick it into high gear and get those last few points you’re going to need to pass the exam on Saturday. After Saturday, login to the CFA Institute’s website or your local society’s website and start looking around. You’ve got at least a month before you need to start thinking about the June exam. Use that time to develop your network and really get to know what it means to be a part of this club of finance professionals.

Good luck on Saturday candidates!

‘til next time, happy testing!
Joseph Hogue, CFA

CFA Exam Day Emergency Preparedness Kit



Three weeks to the December CFA Level 1 Exam and you are probably nose-deep in your curriculum books trying to get those last few points. Well, I want to take your mind off of studying for just a second to talk about a different kind of exam preparation, preparing for that first Saturday in December with a CFA Exam Day Emergency Preparedness Kit.

You might not have thought much about it yet but just assumed you would gather up the necessary things a couple of days before the exam and everything would be alright. After all, how difficult can it be? You just need your identification, admission ticket, a calculator and a few other incidentals, right?

Over my three years of testing I saw candidates bring along a lot of things to the exam, from tiny sandwich bag size packs to backpacks full of resources. Every year there was more than one candidate, in fact usually quite a few, that was turned away for lack of the right materials or that left the test center near tears because their lack of preparedness cost them the success for which they had worked so hard.

Emergency Preparedness Kit for Candidates

Most likely you’ve heard of having an emergency kit in the car in case you get stranded somewhere. It’s probably got flares, a blanket, some water and maybe a little food. But do you really need an emergency preparedness kit for the CFA exam?

You’ve just spent 300+ hours of your life over a short period of time, sacrificing a social life and time with your family just to pass this exam. Nearly 50% of all candidates fail their exam any given year and the difference between passing and band ten is razor thin. You tell me, do you think it is serious enough to have an emergency kit?

There are two categories of items that will go into your kit, required materials and emergency goods. The required materials are going to be things like your admission ticket, a calculator and your passport. You won’t even be able to get into the exam or to have any hope of passing without these. It’s not stuff that you would normally put in an emergency kit, but there’s no sense in having two kits for the exam so I’m keeping everything together. The emergency items in your kit are things that you don’t necessarily need and may not even use but you will thank your prospective deity if you end up needing them.

  • International Passport – You must have a valid government-issued passport to get into the testing center. There are no exceptions and I can almost guarantee that there will be someone at your testing center that gets turned away. Physically check your passport; today, no right now to make sure the expiration date is after the exam day and that all your information matches that of your admission ticket. With three weeks left, you should still have time to get your passport changed if you need to but you cannot afford to wait.
  • Admission Ticket – This is another required item and it must be printed on clean, unused paper. Do not mark anywhere on your admission ticket, front or back. The information on your ticket must match what is on your passport so you might as well check it now while you are checking your passport. Admission tickets are now available on the CFA Institute website for printing.
  • Pencils – CFA Level 1 candidates only need to bring pencils to the exam. I have seen candidates forget pencils and I have seen candidates bring boxes of more than 10 pencils. I recommend bringing five pencils, not that you will probably need more than one or two but it could save you the time of sharpening them. Take a manual pencil sharpener as well. This is one of those emergency items. I always had enough pencils that I never used my sharpener but you should definitely take one.
  • Calculator – I always used the Texas Instruments BA II Plus but I know people that swear by the HP calculator as well. It’s your choice just as long as you have one in your kit. I have seen candidates take two calculators, just in case. I never did but it does make sense, especially if you have extras anyway. Changing batteries can take time and you will need to reconfigure the calculator. If nothing else, you should have an extra battery in your emergency kit and a small screwdriver. You will almost certainly not need it but it is much better to have it than need it.
  • Medical products – We start getting into the true emergency items with things like aspirin, cough drops, tissues, wet wipes and band aids. You might not need any of them but can you imagine trying to grind your way through a six-hour test with a throbbing headache? Coughing and wiping your nose on your sleeve for six hours is not going to help your score any either.
  • Wristwatch – Some people like to keep an eye on the time while others feel it is more of a distraction. I would recommend taking a watch even though the proctors post the time left at the front of the test center. Time management is critical and you will want to know exactly how much time is left.
  • Earplugs – You only need to hear stories of loud traffic or lawn mowers outside the exam site to know that earplugs are a good idea. Even if you are not normally distracted by ambient noises, you might as well take a pair just in case.
  • Extra money for a taxi – This one depends on how far you live from the test site and how you plan on getting there on exam day. You need to plan for two ways of getting to the exam, just in case your primary transportation fails. Know the bus schedule or someone that you can call at the last minute for a ride. It only takes a few minutes and can save you the agony of missing the exam completely because you were a few minutes late to the testing center.

Don’t count on putting any of this stuff together the day of the exam or even the day before the exam. Test day is stressful enough without having to worry about finding some cough drops or realizing that you misplaced your passport. There will be an area outside of the exam room where you can store your personal items or you can just leave them in your car if you drive.

We will never know how many candidates miss the exam each year because some unforeseeable circumstance kept them from success. We will also never know how many candidates were too distracted by bad circumstances to be able to think clearly and pass the exam. These things do happen, just make sure they don’t happen to you.

Just three weeks left. Good job, you’re almost there.

‘til next time, happy studyin’
Joseph Hogue, CFA

It’s the Toughest Roads that Make the Best Journeys



First off, I just realized that in all the build-up to the December exam I forgot to congratulate June candidates for their hard work and success. I say success because, pass or fail, you committed to one of the most difficult professional programs in the world and are a better professional for it. I especially want to congratulate the 14,000 candidates that passed the CFA Level 3 exam and are on their way to receiving the charter. You’ve joined a select group in the industry and accomplished what few have been able to do.

Looking over exam results has me reminiscent of my own years studying the CFA curriculum. It’s reminded me of something I heard a long time ago from a teacher in high school. It’s the toughest roads that make the best journeys.

Would you do it all again?

The maxim is absolutely true and this may come as a shock but someday you will look back on those days with your nose buried in the CFA curriculum books with a desire to relive it.

“What?” you say, “No way, I would ever want to go through that again!”

Don’t be so sure. It’s been more than 15 years since I finished boot camp in the U.S. Marine Corps, one of the most difficult mental and physical journeys of my life, and I still remember it vividly. I constantly had to push myself beyond what I thought possible and the challenge was spectacular. I’ve yet to find another road that led to such a feeling of accomplishment or that has been as memorable.

And you will feel the same way about your years studying for the CFA exam. Right now, all you know is the constant struggle of practice problems and learning outcome statements. With every exam, you start to see the bigger picture and how much you’ve grown as a true professional. I still look back at those years and that sense of growth fondly, and I’ll bet that you will too.

No one said the road to earning the CFA charter would be easy. You will be pushed to test your limits of intellectual perseverance and commitment. You will likely question the program’s worth and your own ability to learn.

But you will also learn what it means to push yourself and sacrifice for a higher level of professional pride. The intellectual growth you achieve will only be exceeded by the feeling of emotional growth and the knowledge that you can make it down any road.

So, for you candidates struggling through those last few precious weeks to December or those of you terrified at the thought of another exam season starting soon, I say enjoy this time of your life.

You’ll miss it.

‘til next time, happy studyin’
Joseph Hogue, CFA

We’ll get back to our review of the CFA Level 1 curriculum next week with a list of must know subjects and some study tips for the last couple of weeks. Make sure you are measuring your progress with mock exams and lots of practice problems.

Does a Change in the Curriculum Make it Even More Important?



We started our CFA Level 1 Review post this week with an important message about the curriculum. Candidates studying for the December exam have an extra incentive to do well and move on to the second exam. They are studying from the 2014 curriculum and all levels will change to the 2015 curriculum come June.

If they do not pass in December, they will need to read three new readings in the 2015 curriculum and will have wasted their time with six readings that have been dropped.

That is a pretty big incentive, but what do the curriculum changes mean for other candidates?

More than you may think.

CFA curriculum in flux

While the official CFA curriculum does not normally change much from year to year, the Institute made some sweeping changes this year for the 2015 curriculum. In all, there are 10 new readings across the three exam levels and nineteen readings have been dropped. While some of the readings have shifted from one exam to another, this is still an extremely big change for the curriculum.

But that isn’t even the biggest change. I was surprised to see that the CFA Institute is changing the topic weights in the 2015 curriculum as well. The relative weights for each topic have been the same since before I was a candidate in 2009 and I don’t think anyone saw the change coming. While most of the weights only changed by a few percentage points, if any, it still means a lot on an exam where half the candidates do not pass and you need every point possible.

If you have made it through any of the exams by only reading study guides in prior years, you may want to rethink the strategy if you are taking the exam next summer.

First, there is a lot of new material in the curriculum. The Institute will not say whether it makes a point of testing new curriculum material but the general consensus among candidates is that it is highly testable information. If the Institute thought it was important enough to include the new material, sometimes at the cost of pushing out older information, then it could very well want to highlight it on the exam.

I have been working with third-party providers for more than two years now and can tell you that preparation of study guides after curriculum changes is an insanely detailed and difficult job. Each page of the curriculum has to be reviewed for changing Learning Outcome Statements and changing readings. If some material is missed when preparing study guides during normal years, it is even worse during years where the curriculum has changed so significantly. You absolutely must read the curriculum if you want the opportunity at 100% of the exam material. FinQuiz offers a happy medium with study notes that are designed to complement the curriculum, not replace it.

We went through the changes to the three curriculum levels in prior posts.

Click here for a review of changes to the CFA Level 1 exam.
Click here for a review of changes to the CFA Level 2 exam.
Click here for a review of changes to the CFA Level 3 exam.

We’ll continue next week with our review of the CFA Level 1 for the December exam. For the rest of you, enjoy your break, it will be time to pick up those books again soon enough.

‘til next time, happy studyin’
Joseph Hogue, CFA

A Secret about the CFA Curriculum that You Won’t Believe



There is a secret that many charterholders do not tell candidates. A secret so terrifying that most candidates probably wouldn’t believe it even if we told you.

After struggling through upwards of 9,000 pages of the curriculum over the course of three years, the truth is nearly impossible to fathom.

But even after more than 900 hours of study and countless study problems…
Many charterholders still read their curriculum.

Keep Your Curriculum Books!

Over the three years I studied for the CFA exams, I couldn’t stand the sight of my growing stack of curriculum books. The journey begins innocently enough with your Level 1 books. You may even be excited when that big box arrives in the mail.

But it doesn’t take long for that excitement to turn to despair and loathing as you toil through thousands of pages while your friends and family go out on the weekends.

Ok, so maybe I’m being a bit melodramatic but the fact is that most candidates avoid the CFA curriculum like the plague while studying for the exams. They rely on condensed study guides to get all their information for the exams. Sometimes it works, other times the candidate is left repeating exams because the study guides didn’t include all the detail needed to pass.

After the final Level 3 exam, the candidate breathes a huge sigh of relief and burns his curriculum books in effigy.

And then something odd happens. It happened to me and I can almost guarantee it will happen to you as well. I found myself referring back to the official curriculum in my professional career as an analyst. It starts like this, you will be looking at a company or sector and thinking how a fundamental difference in the group affects its valuation. Maybe the industry typically carries an especially high amount of goodwill on the books or maybe an accounting convention within the industry is different from other industries. It depends on where you work and the exact duties in your role but maybe you do not regularly account for that kind of detail in your analysis.

Then you remember, there was a whole section in the CFA curriculum about just such a practice! You scramble to the nearest library (because you burned your books, remember) to thumb through the curriculum. You read through the section and add it to your analysis.

This isn’t a wild story or something that will only happen to you on rare occasions. Your time spent studying for the CFA will commit to memory the basic idea of the readings even if you do not exactly remember the details. While your job as an analyst will involve going beyond the curriculum’s detail in some sections, there are some sections that you may not use or will only use broader estimates.

For example, while the curriculum goes into great depth and detail to adjust the financial statements in a number of different accounts (i.e. pensions, long-lived assets, inventories and intercorporate investments) you will likely not go into so much detail in your valuation models. That is not to say that your models will not be robust but maybe the level of detail just isn’t always needed. Until that day when you see a particular deal announced or a news release and think, “maybe this changes things and I need to look further into the details.” When you do look into the details, and it produces some real value for your firm, you will be generously rewarded.

The curriculum is your friend, you just don’t know it yet

I know it is tough to imagine how reading 3,000 pages of curriculum is a better option that relying on a 1,500 page study guide. You’ll just have to trust that all the time spent reading through the detail will pay off down the road.

This industry is full of highly intelligent and committed people. Every one of them has a cash flow model and has spent hours (more like years) studying how to analyze companies in their industry. You will only be able to compete if you can find the details that others miss. Reading the whole CFA curriculum when many candidates avoid it may just be your chance to uncover those details.

…and keep the books. It will save you a trip to the library later.

‘til next time, happy studyin’
Joseph Hogue, CFA

I Can’t Believe I Read the Entire CFA Curriculum



I wrote last week about the importance of reading the entire CFA curriculum and that too many candidates miss out of valuable points due to only relying on study guides. If my inbox is any indication, many candidates are still skeptical that they can get through the curriculum in their limited time available and much less with their sanity intact.

Aziz from Turkey writes, “I understand the importance of the curriculum and know deep down that I should read it but just cannot find the time. What if I read a study guide two or three times in the same time it takes for the curriculum? Is that not better?”

Vikas in India points to another problem many candidates have when he writes, “The curriculum is SO BORING! Some of the information is interesting but too much academic writing makes it impossible to get past.”

I completely understand both of these points. I worked a full-time job throughout my CFA studies and was married while studying for the final test. Throw in a social life and who has the time to get through thousands of pages of material?

If you want to pass the CFA exams, then you have to make time. I’ve written a few posts about finding time for the exams. It can be difficult to sacrifice a little more time for studying but we are all investors here and I guarantee you the return you realize for that extra time will be well worth it. As I wrote in last week’s post, you must commit to the official curriculum if you want the max points possible. Studying only the study guides is a sure way to miss important information that is left out. Studying these guides three or four times isn’t going to help if the material is not in there.

I did get some positive feedback from a few candidates on last week’s post. Mark from St. Louis writes, “I tried for two years to pass the Level I CFA Exam with only study guides. I tried two different providers but failed the exam each year. On the third attempt, I committed to reading the entire curriculum and finally made it through. Can’t say that it was only because of the curriculum but I can say that there was information in the books that I don’t remember seeing in the study guides.”

Making it through the curriculum is one thing, making it through the curriculum without falling asleep every couple of hours is another thing. I agree that the curriculum can be a little boring at times. Think of it as exercise for all those company reports you will need to read as an analyst. If you thought 2,500 pages of the CFA curriculum is tough to get through in six months then you have a rude awakening coming as an analyst.

Reading through the curriculum translates to about 400 pages a month. As an analyst, I read through that just about every week! You will constantly be looking through annual and quarterly reports, trade journals and other analyst’s commentary in your daily work routine. Not all of it is going to be compelling material and you just have to learn to push through it. Taking quick notes in the margin of the page helps to stay focused and there’s nothing wrong with a little help from Mr. Coffee.

No one said it would be easy working through the entire CFA curriculum but it is definitely worth your time. It takes determination and sacrifice but those traits will serve you well that first Saturday of June and for the rest of your life. Good luck.

‘til next time, happy studyin’
Joseph Hogue, CFA

Warning: Do Not Neglect the CFA Curriculum



The actual length of the CFA curriculum varies a little each year but it’s generally between 2,500 and 3,200 pages. When you get the books in the mail, or receive the digital version, that may seem like a monstrous task. Over the three years of studying for the exams, I think my upper body strength grew just as much as my financial knowledge just from carrying the books around.

Study guides meant to substitute for the curriculum vary but generally range between 1,400 and 1,700 pages. At under two-thirds the length of the official curriculum, it seems like a no-brainer and I know many candidates who have only rarely even peaked inside their curriculum books.

And many of them are still candidates.

Do Not Neglect the Official Curriculum!

Candidates that have tried to substitute the CFA curriculum with study guides have come to me afterwards with their horror stories. My reply is always the same, “I wish we had talked before because if you do the math then the answer is pretty obvious.” The minimum passing score for the exams is never released but I would guess it is around sixty-five percent. No candidate has failed with a score of 70% or better and I doubt if the Institute would want to charter someone that knows less than two-thirds of the subject matter.

Even the most gifted candidates are going to miss points. If about half the candidates fail the exam every year, I am guessing that most miss at least a tenth of the points and probably much more. We have no way of knowing but it’s obvious that you need every point you can get.

Now, I have seen pretty much all the study guides commercially available. There are some that do a pretty good job of condensing the material but none are able to get everything in a packet that is half the length of the curriculum. It’s impossible and information is going to get left out. Try to fit nearly 3,000 pages of information in less than 2,000 pages of notes and I would say you’re lucky if 20% of the information isn’t lost.

So if you neglect the official curriculum completely, you are already out something like 20% or more of the points. Now you need to remember at least 80% of the material just for a score of 64% on the exam.

Most of you have taken practice exams through test banks or the CFA Institute. How many have scored better than 80% on these? I know reading all those books is a daunting task but you just cannot afford to leave points on the table by neglecting the official curriculum.

I don’t talk about the FinQuiz study notes much here on the blog other than to reference specific sections of the notes and the curriculum. I don’t want candidates to think I am being biased by pushing one particular study provider over another. But I can say, without any bias, that the FinQuiz notes have at least one big advantage over other study products, that they are meant to be used as a complement to the curriculum instead of a substitute.

The FinQuiz notes vary by length as well but are generally around 600 pages, formatted by Learning Outcome Statement. By basing the notes on each individual LOS, FinQuiz condenses the information down to just enough to clarify the curriculum and make sure candidates check and understand each LOS. You will still need the curriculum, but the notes provide a brief explanation on each of the LOS so you can reference if you need additional help. It’s really the best of both worlds, you get 100% of the information from the curriculum and additional condensed explanations where you need them.

Free examples of the FinQuiz notes are available for download on the website. Take a look and compare them with the curriculum. FinQuiz regularly offers discounts on products and packages so you may want to contact the provider to get the best deal possible.

‘til next time, happy studyin’
Joseph Hogue, CFA

Candidate Warning: Use WhatsApp Carefully



I have been amazed at the growth of WhatsApp study groups just over the last year. Six of the top ten most popular posts on the LinkedIn CFA Candidates group are calls for a WhatsApp group, including the most popular post which has 369 comments.

The draw of the application is that users can send text messages without paying the SMS fees associated with most carriers. With over 118,000 candidates across the globe, there is no lack of members eager to connect especially when there is not much of a local group.

I contacted a few candidates that have used the WhatsApp groups for their insight into the phenomenon. The response was almost entirely positive from the group with a few big caveats.

Avoid common problems with messaging groups

The group members I talked to generally said that their experience with WhatsApp groups was positive but had a few warnings for those considering the groups. Some are specific to the CFA exam while other problems are more common to groups in general.

WhatsApp may be a great resource for asking questions and sharing insight into those tough topics, but don’t forget that the best way to prepare for the CFA exams is still through practice problems. I always set a goal for at least 2,400 practice problems, ten times the amount on the exam, for my test preparation. Doing these problems gets you physically ready to handle a six-hour test and helps to convert the material to long-term memory through repetition.

Make sure you are not spending too much time on the WhatsApp group. Studying for the CFA exams can be incredibly isolating and candidates have a tendency to confront this by spending lots of time in groups and searching through forum topics. Spending a little time each week socializing with local candidates can be a great way to avoid this and can also help make connections that will help you down the road.

Make sure you double-check answers you receive with the curriculum or study guides. There is nothing that guarantees the answer you receive from other candidates is correct. Problems with incorrect answers are not generally a problem with larger groups since the consensus usually corrects the misinformation.

Some caveats to groups in general include:

  • Avoid the temptation to use the group for a conversation with one member. Unless you are answering a specific question that is relevant to the entire group, these conversations are best left to private messaging.
  • Make sure you keep the conversation relevant. This is tied to the caveat above but can often envelope several members and steer the group off topic. There are plenty of forums for discussing your love of cheese (or whatever), you are here to help each other pass the CFA exams.
  • Don’t assume that everyone understands your short-hand text messages. Whole dictionaries could be written on the jumbled mix of letters that have come to be used for text conversations. Some users may not understand your use of acronyms or abbreviations.

It has also struck me how freely candidates share their WhatsApp number on the web. I asked a few candidates and no one expressed any concerns with privacy. I imagine the risk to posting on a very specific forum like the CFA Candidates group would be minimal but I am still interested in hearing if anyone has had a problem with the dissemination of their number. Use the comment section below.

We’ll continue our review of the Level 1 CFA exam next week for December candidates. For those not planning on sitting for the December exam, enjoy your break!

‘til next time, happy studyin’
Joseph Hogue, CFA

Preparing for the December Exam with a Jump on Next June



One of the most common questions I get from new CFA candidates is if it is possible to take the December Level 1 exam and then sit for the Level 2 CFA exam the following June.

To which I reply, “Possible, of course. Recommended, maybe.”

What’s the hurry?

Maybe the three years that have passed since I was a candidate have made me forget how anxious candidates are to be done with the exams. I understand that, like any academic credential, completion of the program is a big step in your career and you just want to get through it.

But are you taking the exams just to pass or are you taking them to learn how to be a better analyst? Trying to fit so much material in so little time may mean you will miss an important opportunity to really master the details. There is a ton of material in the CFA curriculum, written by some of the best minds in the industry, but a lot of it will go in one ear and out the other if you do not take your time.

Taking both the December and June exams makes for a tough schedule as well. Upwards of 600 hours studying over about nine months means a minimum of 15 hours per week devoted to the curriculum. Studying for 15 hours a week is achievable but you are going to risk some massive burnout trying to do it for such an extended period.

Even passing both the December and June exams will only get you the charter a year earlier, and that is if you will have the necessary work experience requirement.

Passing in the fast lane

For those of you intent on getting through the exams as quickly as possible, there is still time for a December and June exam schedule. You’ve got 18 weeks to the December exam which means you can accumulate the 300 hours of minimum study with a little over 15 hours per week. Some will be able to pass on less than 300 hours but many will not and it is much better to over-study than to fail an exam.

There is one advantage to the quickened strategy, that you will not need to review the Level 1 material while studying for the second exam. A lot of the material in the Level 2 exam is repeated or closely builds from the first exam. Many candidates find themselves having to review before going on to new information because of the six-month hiatus from studying.

Paying attention to the topic weights for each exam will help immensely. The first exam heavily weights Ethics and Financial Reporting. The second exam heavily weights Financial Reporting and Equity Investments. The material on Ethics and Professional Standards does not change much across each exam so spending extra time mastering it for the first exam could save you a lot of time studying for the Level 2 exam. I would also spend a lot of time studying Financial Reporting and Equity Investments within the Level 1 curriculum. You absolutely must master the material on financial statements in the first exam to be able to understand the Level 2 Financial Reporting and Equity Investments material.

You cannot afford to neglect any of the topic areas but spending the majority of your time during your Level 1 studying in these three topics will help give you a head start on the second exam.

After the Level 1 exam, taking at least a few weeks off is probably a good idea but you will want to start studying for the June exam as soon as possible. The Level 2 CFA exam is regarded as the most difficult by many candidates, especially for its huge amount of formulas.

I guess there is nothing wrong with a December-June exam schedule if you do not mind studying overtime for the better part of a year. Even if you are not successful on one of the exams, time spent studying is time well-spent and will help you in your career. Just remember not to neglect other aspects of professional development like networking or taking on more responsibility at work.

‘til next time, happy studyin’
Joseph Hogue, CFA

Professional Networking in the Virtual Age



I have a confession to make. I am one of the worst offenders of what I am about to post but I bet I’m not alone. I have 810 connections on LinkedIn and according to the site that puts more than 14.7 million other professionals in my network.

But would I be able to tell you anything about 90% of those first-level connections? Probably not.

And that is where many find themselves, with a huge virtual network but no real connections to help manage their professional career.

Maybe networking is not supposed to be this easy

While traditional networking should not be the painful process that many see it as, I’m not sure that it should be as easy as clicking ‘accept’ with no exchange between yourself and another. Sure, there are clear benefits to expanding your network through virtual platforms. We are able to build relationships with people that we would otherwise never meet. My ‘network’ spans nearly every country and just about every industry. Virtual networks help us keep in touch with our connections on a much more frequent basis than we probably could otherwise as well. A quick scan through profile changes lets me stay updated on what people in my network are doing.

But then there are the obvious disadvantages and traps we fall into as well. The ease of virtual networking has given us a false sense of connection and made it easy to neglect establishing stronger relationships. After all, why do I need to work to establish 10 strong connections when I can set up a network of 14.7 million with the click of the mouse?

Having too many ‘connections’ will make it impossible to really keep up with the connections you need to manage your career. Most of the social platforms are set up to run a news feed of things happening in your network. Are the important events and updates in your network getting buried under a pile of news from people you barely know?

Ultimately networking is about using those connections to help each other professionally, whether directly or indirectly through a second-level connection. Do you think you could do this with most of your connections? Would you feel comfortable recommending the people in your network based upon what you know about each of them? You are the only one that can answer the question, “How many connections are too many.”

Time to develop real connections

The benefits of virtual platforms for networking are too good to let them go to waste by superficially building your network so make a commitment to take advantage of them.

I know a lot of people will recommend going through your connections and deleting anyone that isn’t directly relevant to your professional sphere. It depends on how many connections you have but this might not be altogether necessary. If your list is still relatively manageable, you might just try categorizing people into spheres of importance. People with which you want to build a strong relationship would go in one folder and all others in another folder.

Once you’ve cleaned up your network, it is time to work on those relationships like you should have at the beginning. Browse through everyone’s profile and categorize connections within groups of experience, topic of expertise or anything else that might make it easier to organize. The idea is that when you have a question or want to talk to someone about a specific topic, you can quickly look through your network for the right person. This will not only help you answer your questions more quickly but will also help you get to know people in your network.

You probably do not need to talk to everyone in your network every week, maybe not even every month, but you should make it a point to interact with them. Before you go to a presentation or other professional event, send out a personal invite to the connections that might be interested. Regularly check up with your connections to get their opinion on the most important news and event for their sector.

Maybe it’s just that virtual networking is still so new for many of us that we have not learned to use it effectively. I know I’ve got a lot of cleaning up to do.

‘til next time, happy networkin’
Joseph Hogue, CFA

Life and the CFA Professional



We finished up our series on career management last week and candidates still have upwards of six months until the study season begins for next year’s exam. It is usually this time of year that I am urging candidates to stay active professionally and academically, but let’s get real here… you busted your butt to prepare for the CFA exam and many of you did it while juggling family and a job.

You deserve a break.

Give the numbers a break

A friend recently confessed to me that he has focused solely on his professional life for so long that he is having trouble disconnecting and just having fun. For the last ten years, he has been singularly driven to improve himself as a professional analyst.

He spends upwards of 50 or 60 hours a week working as an analyst in a Chicago commodities firm, usually spending a few hours at home each night to finish up on some reading. The books he reads during his free-time are usually somehow related to work, i.e. financial history, commodities and other concepts in investing. He goes out once or twice a week but much of the time it is to networking or other professional social events. His life has become so limited that, when he does go out with friends, the only thing they talk about is work.

I can sympathize with his plight and can see a lot of myself in the story. The industry is extremely demanding and sometimes being successful means sacrificing other parts of our lives but it should not become your life 24/7 and 365 days. Maybe the biggest challenge many of us face is limiting the time spent working or in professionally-related activities during those periods of the year where we can have some real free-time.

You need a hobby

There are a million-and-one hobbies and things you can do to take your mind off of the industry. If you’re having trouble thinking of an activity or hobby, try a web search for bucket lists. These lists of things people want to do before they die can be a great resource for one-time events or things you can do on a regular basis.

One of the most detailed bucket lists I’ve found is at:

http://bucketlistjourney.net/2012/01/543-bucket-list-ideas/

I like to exercise as one of the things to take my mind off of work. I know a lot of analysts that become extremely competitive in their sport or activity, almost taking it to the professional level. Even if you don’t push yourself to the limit, challenging yourself physically can really take your mind off of everything else.

Cooking is another hobby I’ve tried to pick up. In our hectic lives where time is money, it can be too easy to order out every night. It’s nice to relax and take the time to create a truly amazing dinner.

Your hobby doesn’t have to be something mainstream or recurring, just something that you might enjoy doing in any particular week. Make a point to spend some time with friends or family. Visit the local museum or a park every once in a while.

‘til next time, relax.
Joseph Hogue, CFA

Getting the Job: From Networking to Interviews and Beyond (part 5)



This is the last post of a series we have run over the prior few weeks highlighting some of the great resources available to candidates through the CFA Institute’s Career Resources. We covered networking, branding, job search techniques and interviews in previous posts. This week, we will wrap it all up with career management and what to do after you’ve got your dream job.

For resources from the Institute: Click through to CFA Institute – then to Career Resources – and then to Library. The first clickable link on the page will take you to, “Sessions on Career Management,” and 39 separate resources. You will need your candidate Id number to login to the site.

Did you forget how hard you worked to get the job?

The resources on career management are all podcasts, between 10 minutes and an hour, and take longer to browse through than the other topics we’ve reviewed. Don’t neglect the topic though, it is one of the most overlooked by employees.

The fact is that many people stop strategically thinking about their career after they land a job. Worse yet, many forget how grateful they were and how hard they worked to get the job and they soon fall into a daily routine that gets them nowhere. Constant career management is about two things, guiding your long-term career goals and guiding your career where you currently work.

Just because you love the company for which you work does not mean you want to or have to work their forever. It may be a great job and give you tons of experience but there are a number of reasons why your long-term plans may take you elsewhere.

  • Is the firm large enough for advancement opportunities?
  • Will the position/sector you want ever be available?
  • Does the firm deal in the asset class in which you want to work?
  • Does the culture fit with your long-term goals, i.e. family

Don’t forget that even the strongest, most long-lived firms may fall on hard times. Even if you see yourself at your current employer, you cannot afford to completely cut yourself off from the rest of the investment community.

Guiding your long-term plans just means being aware of how you want your career to progress, what rungs do you want in your career ladder, and devising a rough plan on how to climb your ladder. This includes knowing the limitations of your current firm and what other firms can offer. The four-part Career Conversations series with Khalid Ghayur lays out the topic very well and is definitely worth a look.

Guiding your career where you currently work may or may not be different from your long-term plan. I included it as a separate idea here because I see a lot of employees quickly fall into a rut after they get the job. The worked so hard to get the position, were so happy to get it but then lose their momentum. That desired position becomes just another job and they miss out on the opportunity to manage their career at the company.

Everyone’s job can get monotonous at times. The best advice I can offer is to formalize milestone career goals. These should be things you want to accomplish within six-months, one-, three- and five-years. The earlier periods (i.e. six-months and a year) should have multiple goals and may be more defined while the longer-term goals may be more strategic and vague. Regularly reevaluate your milestone goals to make sure you still want to get there and you are on track to achieve them.

Again, doing all this alone will not be half as effective as seeking the advice of someone else. With career management it is better to seek the advice of a supervisor or mentor rather than a peer. You don’t have to tell your supervisor that you see your long-term goals at another company but talk with them openly about how you can advance at the firm.

It strikes me, writing this series on getting a job and career management, that two very important ideas are prevalent across all the topics.

  • You need to be strategic to reach your goals. Know where you want to go and plan on how you can get there. Planning two steps ahead will put you at least one step ahead of the rest of the crowd that is reacting to their environment instead of guiding it.
  • You need to be active to reach your goals. Too many people passively go with the flow and wait for opportunities to come their way. Unless you have a guardian angel (i.e. someone that is pushing you to your goal and being active for you) then opportunities are not going to seek you out. You need to seek them out by knowing where you want to go and putting yourself in front of them. Attend conferences and professional events, be active in your local CFA society, do research into special topics and become an expert in things that may not be directly related to your current position.

We’ve still got at least four months before you need to start thinking about the next CFA exam. This is the perfect time to review the resources on the CFA Institute’s website, career resources or otherwise. Don’t just be a participant in your life’s story, actively guide it and you won’t regret where you end up.

‘til next time, happy job huntin’
Joseph Hogue, CFA

Getting the Job: From Networking to Interviews and Beyond (part 4)



This is the fourth post of a series we will run over the next few weeks highlighting some of the great resources available to candidates through the CFA Institute’s Career Resources. We covered networking, branding and job search techniques in previous posts. This week, we will look at one of the most intimidating and difficult stages for many candidates, interviewing.

For resources from the Institute: Click through to CFA Institute – then to Career Resources – and then to Library. There are five linked-documents for interviewing, most offering a list of tips. You will need your candidate Id number to login to the site.

From 1-in-100 to 1-in-10
Congratulations, you have made it through the mountain of submitted resumes for a position and actually landed an interview. Getting the call for an interview is a huge affirmation of your skills and experience, especially in today’s ultra-competitive environment.

As great as it is to make it to this stage, don’t forget that there are likely at least five or ten other candidates that want the job as badly as you. You’ve improved your chances but you can’t let up on the effort until you sign the employment contract.

Among the resources on the CFA Institute’s page, “Effective Interviewing and Negotiating Techniques” and “The 25 Most Difficult Questions…,” offer the best notes on preparation.

  • Understand the company and the type of person they usually hire. Are many from a specific school or field of study? Do they prefer newbies or people with strong experience? What is the workplace atmosphere, laid-back or hard-charging? Most candidates will give a cursory glance at the company’s website but this won’t tell you anything about how personalities fit in the office. Proving you are a good fit with the culture is just as important as proving your skills and experience.
  • As with your resume, it is important to be able to answer questions with definitive proof. Make sure you are able to support your skills with an anecdote and quantitative proof.
  • Be brief and listen to what they are saying. Avoid talking for more than a couple of minutes without some input or response from the interviewer. This will help avoid rambling or getting off topic. If you can turn the interview into a conversation, it becomes much more enjoyable for both and increases your chance of making a connection.
  • Don’t be afraid to ask for feedback on your answers and skills. If you can address the interviewer’s biggest problems/concerns during the interview then you’ll have a better chance when they are making the decision later.

The ‘Behavioral Interviewing Worksheet’ provides a nice template for answering experiential questions. These behavioral experience questions are popular with many employers because they cause you to ‘prove’ your abilities through actual experience. Make sure you keep each part of the question brief, the worksheet recommends 2-3 sentences, because it can be too easy to ramble and lose focus.

If you thought you were done with networking when you got the call for an interview, think again. One of the best suggestions I’ve ever heard was to find someone already working for the company to get the inside-scoop on the interview. They may not offer much, depending on how well you know each other but it is an opportunity you do not want to pass up. Does the company ask behavioral questions, will there be some kind of test, do they ask opinion or off-topic questions? Having an idea of the type of questions could save you a ton of time in preparation.

While it should go without saying, make sure you follow-up with everything you promised in the interview. Did you promise to provide contacts for references or to find some other information? At minimum, you need to send an email thanking the interviewer for their time.

As with most of the steps we’ve looked at in the series, you really need to be working with someone on your interviewing skills. It’s easy to sit there and read your pitch back to yourself but you’ll never get the feedback you need. Find someone else on the LinkedIn CFA group or around your city that is also job hunting and team up for feedback and support.

Next week, we’ll wrap up the series with career management and what to do after you get the job.

‘til next time, happy job huntin’
Joseph Hogue, CFA

Getting the Job: From Networking to Interviews and Beyond (part 3)



This is the third post of a series we will run over the next few weeks highlighting some of the great resources available to candidates through the CFA Institute’s Career Resources. We covered networking and branding in previous posts. This week, we will look at resume writing and strategic job searches.

For resources from the Institute: Click through to CFA Institute – then to Career Resources – and then to Library. The Personal Branding material is about halfway down the page. Resumes and Strategic Job Searches are the last two topics on the page. You will need your candidate Id number to login to the site.

Do people still use resumes?
There is only one resume link to, “Insider Tips for Resume Writing,” offering nine bulleted tips. In the age of ubiquitous internet profiles, resumes may seem outdated but are still universally used by employers.

HR and employer time is limited, especially with the hundreds of resumes they may be receiving, so it is imperative that you get there attention quick. Put a summary section above everything else that gives a one or two sentence pitch and offers a few bullet points of your top achievements or skills.

One of the hardest but most important things to do on a resume is to quantify your accomplishments. Anyone can say they helped improve the return on a portfolio but you need to be able to prove it. Spend some time to analyze your own contribution to your past employers. Did you suggest and/or lead a project or investment. If your split with the employer was friendly, they might be able to offer ways to quantify your accomplishments.

In keeping with the idea of a restricted time reading your resume, the tips suggest limiting it to two pages though I am still from the old school that tries for one page. This means limiting the amount of information and the number of employers you list. Focus on your most recent and most relevant experience.

Crafting a superb resume is still not going to get you out of networking. The author of the linked tips states that 75% of all new positions are won through networking. While I’m thinking this seems a little high, you absolutely must make those personal connections.

Strategic Job Searches
I couldn’t have told you what ‘strategic job searches’ were before I started this post but the Institute offers nine files for review so I figure there must be something to it. From reading through the resources, it appears that searching ‘strategically’ is just integrating all the topics (i.e. resume writing, branding, networking, interviewing) and formalizing a process for the search.

As a type-A person who likes to have everything planned out ahead of time, the need for a strategic search seems obvious but the resources are no less helpful. It strikes me that a lot of candidates think getting a job begins with a search on Monster or eFinancialCareers but have very little idea of what they actually want to do besides make money. If you do not fully understand what you want and what you can offer, then you won’t be able to relay that to a potential employer and will have nothing to separate yourself from the crowd.

I would highlight two resources available on the site. Effective Job Search Campaigns gives you a template, though you may want to add or delete some sections, to formalize a marketing plan and a few helpful tips on networking.

Job Search Strategies for Today is probably the most detailed resource with 44 slides that cover quite a few different topics including resumes, planning and social media. You will want to take some of the ideas within this resource to develop the template from the previous resource.

Next week, we’ll look at those all-important interviewing skills.

‘til next time, happy job huntin’
Joseph Hogue, CFA

Getting the Job: From Networking to Interviews and Beyond (part 2)



This is the second post of a series we will run over the next few weeks highlighting some of the great resources available to candidates through the CFA Institute’s Career Resources. We covered networking in last week’s post and, as much as I would like to move into resumes and interviewing, we need to cover something almost completely overlooked by job candidates…personal branding.

For resources from the Institute: Click through to CFA Institute – then to Career Resources – and then to Library. The Personal Branding material is about halfway down the page. I like the first link, “Building and Managing a Professional reputation,” for its straight-forward questions but it won’t take much time to browse through all the material on the site. You will need your candidate Id number to login to the site.

Personal branding? It’s not like I’m Coca Cola

You may not be a multi-billion dollar company with a product to push but you are still trying to sell something, yourself and your skills.

Sure, you hold the CFA designation or are working towards it but that puts you in the company of about 280,000 other charterholders and candidates. That is on top of the masses of new finance grads and the consolidation in equity analysis over the last few years that has left fewer positions for which job seekers must compete.

Personal branding WILL get you a job! I can say this so confidently because the process is so neglected by job seekers that working it into your job search will distinguish you from all the rest. As with networking, there are several slideshows and resources on the Institute’s webpage. Most are relatively brief, notes from a presentation, so you might want to check out something from the library. You don’t have to spend weeks developing a plan but give it the time it deserves and it will pay off.

Branding is actively creating a perception of yourself and your skills. This means sitting down to think through the idea and writing down a formal plan. Do not just spend 30 minutes and figure that you will remember your brand without writing it out. Actively creating your brand means seeking out ways to display it so it gets built into people’s perception. This includes public speaking, writing or blogging, as well as highlighting it on all your communications material like resumes and business cards.

The best advice I got from the resources on the website was to be focused and differentiated, understand your value proposition and the specialized solutions you can offer. Think creatively here. Experience is not the only value proposition. If you lack experience, you need to develop your brand around something else.

Potential brands

  • Cross-specialization : Are you someone that has strong experience in other areas? There are tons of analysts out there but many cannot put two sentences together intelligibly. I have built my brand around being able to produce persuasive and thoughtful writing around strong fundamental analysis.
  • Perseverence: Everyone says they are passionate and will, “do what it takes.” If you can prove it with a short anectdote then the brand might be yours. Have at least two stories of how you went above and beyond or overcame huge obstacles.
  • Be the First or the Leader: You don’t necessarily have to be the very first to do something as long as there are few that do it. Make sure to pick something that will be in demand by a large enough universe of employers.
  • Be the Expert: This doesn’t necessarily mean being the global expert but could be the Expert among the group of job candidates. If you do not work in the topic or have much experience, you’ll have to take the time to develop it. Read everything you can on the subject and seek ways to develop your expertise. Volunteer to speak on the topic or submit analysis to journals or to newsletters.

As with any communications strategy, branding works best if it is integrated across multiple channels. You need to focus on your brand across your LinkedIn profile, resume and cover letters, business cards and in your face-to-face interactions.

Whatever brand you choose, stop saying you are, “well-rounded!” Do you know what this tells me, that you do not know your strengths or are not an asset in any particular area. It is fine to have some good general knowledge but you need to be able to bring something extra to the team.

Next week, we’ll look at a few resume tips and some job search strategies.

‘til next time, happy branding.
Joseph Hogue, CFA

Getting the Job: From Networking to Interviews and Beyond



This is the first post of a series we will run over the next few weeks highlighting some of the great resources available to candidates through the CFA Institute’s Career Resources. We’ll start with some networking ideas, highlighting some of the best articles, handouts and presentations available on the site.

Through the next few weeks, we’ll move through the career search highlighting interviewing, resumes, personal brand development and communication skills. Don’t feel like you have to wait for the posts though, click through to the CFA Institute’s site and take a look at some of the resources available.

Click through to CFA Institute – then to Career Resources – and then to Library
You will need your candidate Id number to login to the site.

It’s not what you know
After 300+ hours studying for your exam and countless hours spent in your undergrad program, I’ve got bad news.  You may have neglected the most important skill for our industry.

Most people think of networking only when they get ready to find a job. Don’t let the fact that you’ll spend much of your day following portfolio returns and market analysis fool you, your success in the investment and asset management industry lives and dies on relationships. This is most obvious for the brokers and advisors but the dealmakers and analysts also need to know who is looking in the market for their advice and expertise.

Networking can be frustrating at first. It’s not really taught in school and the ease of social media platforms like LinkedIn has given people a false impression of how to really make connections. Networking is not adding someone as a “connection” on your profile and it is not simply “Liking” someone’s repost of the cat playing piano video.

Networking is about getting to know others, their job and their personality, and understanding how the two of you can work together to achieve both your goals.

Ok, so most of you are saying, “That’s fine but I NEED a job now and that’s the only thing I’m thinking about.” That’s understandable and your networking will eventually lead to job opportunities, but…

Try to approach networking first as the opportunity to meet others in the industry and learn. Too many job hunters rush through getting to know someone and jump right into asking for a job. When you do this at a social event or conference, you immediately stop being someone with which the other person is interested in building a relationship and become just another resume.

There are a few handouts and multimedia podcasts available on the CFA site, my favorite is, “Building Success through Strong Networking,” put out by Marshall Brown & Associates. Handouts like these will give you tips and some good starter advice for networking but the best way to learn is by getting out there and practicing.

Don’t just scan through the handouts. Actively read through and compare the advice with your experience in the last couple of times you’ve been to a social or networking event. Did you do anything particularly well? Chances are you will find some points that you either didn’t do well or actively avoided. Use the handout and your experience to write out a networking plan, not a long book on meeting people but a half page outline on what you are going to do at the next event you attend.

Better yet, write it on a small index card and take it to the event with you. Looking back on the outline during the event can be a great way of forcing yourself to do some of the things that you actively avoided in the past.

There are a ton of tips available in the handouts but my favorite is to network with a friend. Working with a peer will help you develop your ‘elevator speech’ ahead of time. At the event, you can use each other to help with introductions. Each of you plan on meeting at least 3-5 people then introduce each other to the people you met. After the event, talk about what you were able to do from your outline plan, what you might have missed and what you learned.

Your local CFA society is your best bet for networking events. From there check out the local business organizations and your connections through LinkedIn. After going to a few events, you will start to see familiar faces and your ‘real’ network will grow exponentially. Start talking about what you want to do through your career and what you think you be great at doing.

Next week, we’ll look at a few resume tips and some job search strategies.
‘til next time, happy networkin’
Joseph Hogue, CFA

After the Exam: Taking a Break without Breaking Your Momentum



First, congratulations on making it through another year of studying for the CFA designation. The relief you feel depends on how many more years you have to earn the charter but the accomplishment is as tremendous for level one candidates as it is for those taking the last exam.

Now, you’re probably sitting there wondering, “What do I do with all this marvelous free-time?” Sure you want to reconnect with friends and re-learn the names of your kids. That in itself might be enough for some people, but we are driven people and need to be doing something more. Even more, no one is relaxing in this industry and you can’t afford to rely on what you learned yesterday to make you competitive tomorrow.

This is a great time to put the material you learned for the CFA exam to practical use. This is going to serve two purposes. First, it is going to reinforce the material and you won’t have to review when you begin studying for the next exam. Levels II and III each have supplemental review sections ahead of many of the readings because many candidates neglect to keep the topics fresh in their mind. Save yourself a lot of time and don’t lose the information you studied so hard to remember.

Using the material is also going to help you grow as a professional. The smartest guy in the room still isn’t worth squat unless he can put his intelligence to good use. Working through the material on a project will help you see what works best and you’ll pick up new ideas along the way.

Being proactive with your own work

If you are not employed or not working in the industry, you absolutely must be putting together your own portfolio of work examples. Want to be an equity analyst? Who is going to hire you if you have never worked on a report? Putting together a couple of sample reports will not get you a job that requires years of experience but it will show your ability and enthusiasm and it will put you higher on the list.

If you can find a mentor, so much the better. This can be a professor or a connection, anyone with prior experience in the field. Have them help you with a roadmap of creating your project; i.e. sources, process, material from the CFA curriculum that you will use. Don’t ask for their entire day, just a lunch to outline what you need to do to put a report together. If you cannot find a mentor or someone to help you for a limited time… you probably are not trying hard enough or are doing something wrong. Our industry, as with many things, is all about networking and you need to develop the skill of reaching out to connections.

Leverage the exams at work

If you’re already working in the industry then talk to your supervisor about how you can use the curriculum in your job. The CFA curriculum is fairly practical so you should already be using some of the material. First, sit back and think through the topic areas and readings yourself. Ask yourself, which parts am I currently using and which might I use more. Of course, this is all assuming that your supervisor is open to change and new ideas. If he’s not then you may want to consider your options because his lack of creativity is eventually going to hold your growth back.

Side projects and team leadership are a dirty word around some offices but can really make your career if you succeed. Keep your ears open to planning and development needs and volunteer to lead or sit in on projects. Keep in mind that you may be studying for the next CFA exam in six months so be mindful of the time the project is going to require.

Whether you add a few responsibilities to your existing role or take on a new role, the idea is to use the material from the CFA curriculum. Just working through the exams and holding the designation has value in itself but it’s nothing compared to being able to use that knowledge.

Would love to hear how you used the information or how working through the exam has helped you professionally.

‘til next time, enjoy your break
Joseph Hogue, CFA

Best Songs, Movies and Activities to Recharge before the CFA Exam



Less than a week left to the exam and there’s little I can tell you that is going to change your test score. At this point, an old Louis Armstrong quote always comes to mind, “Man, if you have to ask…, you’ll never know.” By now in your studies, you’ve either got it or you don’t.

It doesn’t mean you can’t get a little more studying done this week. I always took the last week before the exam off from work to get another 40 hours of review before I closed the books, but that is what it should be, review. Just cementing the information in your memory before the big day.

Whether you are using the last week for one last cram-session or not, your brain probably feels like about three pounds of slush and you just can’t wait to get through Saturday. It’s always about this time that I needed to step back and recharge.

Watch – Listen – Or Just Do It!

There’s about a million and one things you can do to get your head back in the game this week. I am a big fan of music and always love a good motivational song. After three hours of studying, I need at least three minutes of rockin’ out to recharge. Some of my favorites for pushing myself just a little bit farther are:

Destiny’s Child, “Survivor”
Eminem, “Lose Yourself”
Europe, “The Final Countdown”
Katy Perry, “Roar”
Kelly Clarkson, “Stronger”
Queen, “We Will Rock You” and “We are the Champions”
Survivor, “Eye of the Tiger”
Twisted Sister, “We’re Not Gonna Take It”
Bon Jovi, “It’s My Life”
U2, “It’s a Beautiful Day”

Ok, so I am definitely showing my age with this list and there’s surely more than ten that could be listed. It was a close call between Twisted Sister and LMFAO, “Sexy and I Know It” for #10 but…hey, I’m a child of the 80s. If nothing else, maybe just reading through my list will help you to relax a little with a good laugh.

I really like movies for relaxing as well but they’re a little harder. When I think of a motivational movie, I want a climactic ending that makes me want to jump up and do something. A lot of great movies just do not have the ending. Others are just too darn long and still others can leave you shell shocked. Try sitting through all 169 minutes of Saving Private Ryan and not thinking long about life afterwards. Anyway, some of my favorite ‘sit back and relax’ movies:

Back to the Future (1985)
Rocky (1976)
Wreck-It Ralph (2012)
Star Wars (1977)
Spiderman (2002)

Again, unless you’re in your 30s or older, you’re probably scratching your head just a little. I originally wrote out nine of my favorites but figured five movies in your last week of studying is probably way too much time in front of the television anyway. Wait until after the exam to sit back with a Star Wars movie marathon (ok, at least the original trilogy).

The die-hard overachievers out there will complain if I don’t add exercise and other activities to the list of stress-relievers. Going out for a jog or a work-out can be a great way to clear your mind and recharge. I wouldn’t be running too many marathons unless you’re used to that kind of thing, but a good 30 minute workout can do wonders.

After six months of studying, you’re probably asking yourself, “What’s a hobby?” As long as you can complete it in a couple of hours or less, a lot of candidates like to return to the past-times that always made them happy. The idea is to pick something that you can enjoy for an hour or less and then get back to the CFA.

Whatever you do to recharge, get to it and get back to studying. Just five days left.

Good luck on Saturday,
Joseph Hogue, CFA